Professor Albert A. Angehrn

Professor of Information Technology at INSEAD

Download INSEAD Knowledge video interview of Professor Angehrn, speaking on the LingHe Simulation; and the CNN.International.com article featuring the now-very-popular EagleRacing simulation, developed by the professor at INSEAD.

INSEAD Contact Information

Bio (pdf) and Bio (web format)

Curriculum Vitae (pdf, with hyperlinks to papers) - soon to be posted

Lecture and Workshop Topics

Research Categories

Languages

List of Publications, Interviews, Press Articles and Conference Papers (per year, 1989-2009)

Bio

Albert Angehrn is Swiss, grew up in Italy, and spends most of his time in France. He holds a doctoral degree in mathematics and is currently Professor of Information Technology at INSEAD where he has been on the faculty since 1989.

One of his passions is the design of games and simulations, as he strongly believes in Learning-by-Doing. His current focus is on games that provide rich learning experiences by allowing users to interact with realistically-behaving virtual characters, operating within realistic contexts and situations — typically in an organization, but also in other specific environments, such as social or multi-cultural contexts (as described in the brief article: "Learning-by-Playing: Bridging the Knowing-Doing Gap in Urban Communities."

His recent focus has been on modeling collaboration dynamics and designing new simulations (codename: L2C – Learning to Collaborate) that show how difficult it is to help people engage in productive collaborations, particularly if they are in highly diverse, geographically distributed groups, and also engaged in complex processes as innovation.

His other interests range from the organizational dynamics of change and innovation — a domain in which he has developed simulations, namely the EIS simulation which is used today in top business schools around the world — to the design and study of virtual environments for knowledge exchange, learning networks dynamics, and intelligent agents operating on the web (see for instance InnoTube). His research has been published in several international academic publications and his projects have been awarded large research funds from the European Community, bringing him regularly in touch with interesting organizations such as IKEA and Ferrari, a number of banks and car manufacturers, and several innovative start-ups.

Effecting change management: a reality with the LingHe Simulation?

"With China's business environment undergoing fast and significant change - partially driven by the introduction of information and communication technologies into business relationships - managers now need to be more effective than ever in implementing change within their organizations."

-- INSEAD Knowledge, December 2008

INSEAD Knowledge interview - December 2008

Link to INSEAD Knowledge article in English and in Chinese

Tackling business problems with online games

"The old adage says experience is the best teacher and simulations are increasingly being used both at business schools and by companies wanting employees to hone their business acumen."

The EagleRacing Simulation

"Eagle Racing"

is a video-based simulation designed to teach business skills

CNN.International.com article

Lecture and Workshop Topics
  • Competing in the Information Age
  • Leadership in the Knowledge Economy
  • Organization Competing
  • Internet Strategies
  • Leading in Change
  • Challenge
  • Innovation
  • Change Management
Research Categories
  • Innovation
  • Leadership
  • Management Learning and Decision Making
  • Virtual Communities
  • Advanced Simulations
  • Intelligent Agents
  • Internet Strategies
  • Collaboration Dynamics
  • Cross-cultural Issues
  • Media and Journalism
Languages
  • German
  • English
  • French
  • Italian
List of Publications, Interviews and Conference Papers (per year, with links to papers: 1989-2009)
2009
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :
"InnoTube: a video-based connection tool supporting collaborative innovation" (with Angelo Marco Luccini and Katrina Maxwell), Interactive Learning Environments, Volume 17, Issue 3, September 2009, pages 205-220.
"EagleRacing: Addressing Corporate Collaboration Challenges Through an Online Simulation Game" (with Katrina Maxwell), published online in: Innovate, Journal of Online Education, vol. 5, Issue 6, Aug/Sept 2009 .
Coopetition” (wih Claudia Loebbecke), in Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management, 2nd edition (forthcoming 2009), Information Science Reference.
"Game Hostile Environments," Proceedings of the "Serious Games on the Move 08" conference, (Eds. Otto Petrovic and Anthony Brand), ISBN: 978-3-211-09417-4, forthcoming in January 2009.
  • Interviews:
"Tackling business problems with online games" web article featuring the EagleRacing simulation as published online by CNN(International).com, Executive Education.
"Inner circle" series of Economist Intelligence Unit articles published by the Economist.com in 2009 (pdf); (initial interview done by Clint Witchalls on June 20, 2007, for the Economist Intelligence Unit).
"Effecting change management: a reality with LingHe Simulation?" (INSEAD Knowledge interview by Karen Cho, reproduced in The Edge Singapore, executiveeducation, January 26, 2009.
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
"CALT report 2009"
2008
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

"Coopetition" (with Claudia Loebbecke), chapter 3.1 2, vol. 3, in Knowledge Management: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications (6-volume set) (Premier Reference) (Hardcover), by Murray E. Jennex (Author, Editor), Information Science Reference.

Understanding the Organizational Dynamics of Change in China, A Multimedia Simulation Approach,” (with Shuming Zhao, Huifang Yang, Philippe Leliaert, and Leo Van Geffen), The Chinese Economy, vol. 41, no.3, May-June 2008, pp. 68-89, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals," (with Angelo Marco Luccini, Katrina Maxwell, and Federico Rajola), Emerging Technologies and Information Systems for the Knowledge Society, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 5288/2008, pp. 167-176 , Springer Link, September 2008, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
TENTube: A Video-based Connection Tool Supporting Competence Development,” (with Katrina Maxwell), International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET), vol. 3, (2008), (pdf, via INSEAD library).
Enhancing Social Interaction in Competence Development Networks: A Conceptual Framework,” (with Katrina Maxwell and Bernard Sereno), International Journal of Learning Technology (IJLT), vol. 3, N°4, pp 424-442, June 2008, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Interviews:
"Effecting change management: a reality with the LingHe simulation?" INSEAD Knowledge, interview by Karen Cho, December 2008; Chinese version of INSEAD Knowledge article.
"Teaching Experience," ICT Results interview, September 2008 (interview by European Commission journalist on the recently completed INSEAD/CALT/EC project entitled: ChangeMasters).
"Serious Games," Bilan, (interview by Cyril Jost, Bilan No.250, 21.05.08, in French).
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
"Design Science in Information Systems: Hegemony, Bandwagon, or New Wave?" (with Frank Land, Claudia Loebbecke, Eric K. Clemons, Alan R. Hevner and Guenter Mueller), ICIS 2008 Proceedings.
"Learning Networks" (with Michael Gibbert), Encyclopedia of Multimedia Technology and Working, ed. Margherita Pagani, Idea Group Inc., 2008.
Increasing Change Readiness in Higher Educational Institutions Through a Simulation-based Change Management Experience” (with Katrina Maxwell), INSEAD working paper N° 2008/26/OB/TOM/CALT.
"Comment conduire le changement dans les rédactions?" keynote presentation (in French), Club SPMI (Syndicat de la Presse, Magazine et d'Information), Friday, November 14, 2008, Salons Hoche, Paris. (Round-table debate led by Christophe Barbier, Editorial Director of the magazine, l'Express).
ChangeMasters Middle East - 5th Congress of Scientific Research Outlook in the Arab World Conference - Fez, Morocco, October 26-30, 2008.
Dynamics of Change and Innovation,” Swedish Business Awards, June 11, 2008, Vilnius, Lithuania), organized by: Embassy of Sweden (Vlnius, Lithuania), Swedish Trade Council, Hansabankas Swedbank, and TeliaSonera.
Utilizing Immersive Interactive Rich Media Platforms for Advanced Leadership Learning,” 4th Annual ECLF Conference, The Future of Leadership and Leadership Learning, July 2-4, Madrid, Spain (hosted by Santander Group).
Game Hostile Environments,” Serious Games on the Move Conference (June 23-24, 2008: Cambridge, United Kingdom).
A Social Network Platform for Vocational Learning in the ITM Worldwide Network,” (with Thierry Nabeth and Nicolas Maisonneuve), IST Africa 2008, Windhoek, Namibia, May 7-9, 2008.
2007
  • Interviews:
"Enabling business flexibility – All change" - interview done by Clint Witchalls on June 20, 2007, for the Economist Intelligence Unit.
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
"Developing change management competencies using simulation games" (guest speaker) conference/ workshop organized by ALBA Graduate Business School, January 31st, 2008 at Divani Apollon Palace in Vouliagmeni.

"IT-Enhanced Experiential Adventures in People Dynamics" IS Forum Seminar Series of the Cambridge Judge Business School, February 2007.

"Training in Action - Innovate to Compete" conference held in Sestri Levante, Italy (hosted by Giunti Labs), June, 2007.
Increasing user value through professional identity profiles, profile-based connection agents and games” (with Katrina Maxwell and Bernard Sereno), HCSIT Summit - ePortfolio International Conference 16-19 October 2007 Maastricht, The Netherlands.

"Launch of ITM Worldwide," INSEAD, October 26, 2007.

"Making Sense 2007”, Aastroem Munier BBN, Stockholm, Sweden, September 27, 2007, and Video presentation.
2006
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :
Coopetition,” (with Claudia Loebbecke), Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management, Ed. David G. Schwartz, Bar-Ilan University, Israel, pp. 58-66, Idea Group Inc., 2006.
"L2C: Designing simulation-based learning experiences for collaboration competencies development," in: The next generation. Research Proceedings of the 13th Association for Learning Technology Conference (ALT-C 2006), eds D. Whitelock and S. Wheeler, pages 31-40, Oxford: Association for Learning Technology.
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:

"The L2C Project: Learning to Collaborate through advanced SmallWorld Simulations" (with Thierry Nabeth), ECTEL 2006, First European Technology Enhanced Learning Conference, 1-4 October 2006, Crete, Greece.

"L2C: Designing Simulation-based Learning Experiences for Collaboration Competencies Development," ALT-C 2006, 13th International Conference of the Association for Learning Technology, 5-7 September 2006, Edinburgh, Scotland.
"Developing Change and Innovation Management Competencies in Rural & Urban Communities: A Social Simulation-Centered Approach," ICICTE 2006, International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies in Education, 6-8 July 2006, Rhodes, Greece.
"Enhancing Lifelong Competence Development and Management Systems with Social Network-based Concepts and Tools" (with Alicia Cheak and P. Sleop), 6th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2006), 5-7 July 2006, Kerkrade, The Netherlands.

Designing SmallWorld Simulations: Experiences and Developments,” 6th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2006), 5-7 July 2006, Kerkrade, The Netherlands.

"Enhancing Social Navigation and Knowledge Exchange within Lifelong Competence Development and Management Systems" (with Alicia Cheak and P. Sleop), Proceedings Workshop Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, Sofia, Bulgaria, 30-31, 2006.
"EduChallenge Learning Scenarios: Designing and Evaluating Learning Scenarios with a Team-Based Simulation on Change Management in Higher Education" (with I. Schönwald, E. Dieter and S. Seufert), SCIL-Universität St Gallen, SCIL Report 8, January 2006.
2005
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :
"Le défi du changement : stimuler les compétences, simuler la complexité," , Revue Ressources Humaines & Management, No. 16, pp. 8-10, January 2005, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

"Learning-by-Playing: Bridging the Knowing-Doing Gap in Urban Communities," Intellectual Capital for Communities, Elsevier, 2005, Chapter 18, pp. 299-316, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

"La formazione contestuale" (with Ruggero Cesaria and Umberto Totti), Sviluppo & Organizzazione No. 211, September/October 2005, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
"Designing Innovation Games for Community-based Learning and Knowledge Exchange," International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, vol. 1, Issue 3, 2005, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

InCA: a Cognitive Multi-Agents Architecture for Designing Intelligent & Adaptive Learning Systems" (with Thierry Nabeth, Liana Razmerita and Claudia Roda), A special issue of ComSIS journal, vol. 3, No. 2., December 2005, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

"Change Process and Resistance to Change in Business Organizations in China" (with Shuming Zhao, Huifang Yang, Philippe Leliaert, and Leo Van Geffen), European Journal of Scientific Research, vol. 3, No. 2, 2005.
  • Press articles:
"Changing Chinese Firms: Overcoming Resistance," (with Shuming Zhao, Huifang Yang, Philippe Leliaert, and Leo Van Geffen), INSEAD Quarterly, No.11, July-September 2005.
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
Learning to Manage Innovation and Change through Organizational and People Dynamics Simulations,” Proceedings of the International Simulation & Gaming Association Conference (ISAGA 05), Atlanta, USA.
"Behind EduChallenge: An Overview of Models Underlying the Dynamics of a Simulation on Change Management in Higher Education" (with I. Schönwald, D. Euler, and S. Seufert), SCIL-Universität St Gallen, SCIL Report 7, December 2005.
2004
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
"Change and Innovation Management in IS/IT: A Simulation Approach," (with Federico Rajola), ECIS 2004 Proceedings.
"Behind the EIS Simulation," CALT report, 2004.
Integrating Context in e-Learning systems Design,” (with Thierry Nabeth and R. Balakrishnan), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2004), Joensuu, Finland, pp. 7355-359, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
"INCA: An Intelligent Cognitive Agent-Based Framework for Adaptive and Interactive Learning" (with Thierry Nabeth and C. Roda), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age (IADIS CELDA 2004).
Embedding 2D Standalone Educational simulation Games in 3D Multi-Users Environments: The Case of C-VIBE” (with Thierry Nabeth), Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2004), Joensuu, Finland, pp. 711-713, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
"Designing Effective Virtual Communities Environments: The ICDT Platform," CALT Report 10-2004.
2003
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

"Guest Editors’ Introduction:: Understanding Learning Networks. Part 1" (with Michael Gibbert and Katerina Nicolopoulou), European Management Journal, vol. 21, No. 5, pages 559-562, October 2003.

Enhancing Knowledge Management Systems with Cognitive Agents,” (with Thierry Nabeth and C. Roda), Systèmes d'Information & Management, vol. 8, No. 2, June, 2003, pp. 69-91, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
Using conversational agents to support the adoption of knowledge sharing practices” (with T. Nabeth, L. Razmerita, and C. Roda), Interacting with Computers, Special Issue on Community-Based Systems, vol. 15, Issue 1, January 2003, pp. 57-89, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:

“On the role of user models and user modeling in Knowledge Management Systems” (with L. Razmerita and T. Nabeth), Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Crete, Greece, June 2003, vol. 2, pp. 450-456.

“Ontology based user modeling for Knowledge Management Systems,” (with L. and A. Maedche), Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on User Modeling, Pittsburgh, USA, Springer-Verlag, 2003 pp. 213-217.

Open Source Platforms Under Co-opetition: A Comparative Analysis of SourceForge and 'CodeX' (Xerox) as Two 'Co-opetitive Learning and Knowledge Exchange Networks'(CoLKENs)” (with Claudia Loebbecke), Proceedings of the Eleventh European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2003), Naples, Italy, June 19-21, 2003.

“Investigating Competitive Learning and Knowledge Exchange Networks (CoLKENs) as Emerging Concept in Management Literature and Practice” (with Claudia Loebbecke), Proceedings of the Fourth European Conference on Organizational Knowledge, Learning, and Capabilities (OKLC 2003), Barcelona, Spain, April 13-14, 2003.

The ICDT Platform: An Overview,” CALT Report, September 2003.

User Manual for C-VIBE (3D Version of the EIS Simulation,” (with M. Kostomaj and T. Nabeth), CALT Report, January 2003.

“Managing Open Source Software (OSS) Communities between Cooperation and Competition” (with Claudia Loebbecke), INSEAD Working Paper, October 2003.

“Learning and Networking in a Virtual World,” Swedish Trade Council Conference, Stockholm, Sweden, 17 November 2003.
“Knowledge and Innovation,” SMS 23rd Annual International Conference, Baltimore, USA, November 9-12, 2003.
“The three key challenges in initiating, managing, and sustaining Regional Learning Networks,” (Invited Presentation) SMS 23rd Annual International Conference, Baltimore, USA, November 9-12, 2003 (with Michael Gibbert).

“eLearning: 1: Issues & Case Studies,” eChallenges (E-2003) Conference, Bologna, Italy, October 22-24, 2003.

“Learning Networks and Advanced Simulations: Research and Application Perspectives,” (Invited Presentation), [email protected] Partners Meeting, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, October 17, 2003.
“Understanding Resistance to Innovation in Learning Networks: A Simulation Approach” (with Michael Gibbert), [email protected] Partners Meeting, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, October 17, 2003.

“Transformer et développer l’entreprise et les territoires par les connaissances : au-delà d’une stratégie, une nécessité, ” KM Forum, Palais des Congrès, Paris, France, October 6-8, 2003.

“Intelligent Agents as Learning and Change Catalysts: The Impact of Socio-Cognitive Engineering on Decision-Making, Knowledge Management and Education,” SCEF-2003: First International Workshop on Socio-Cognitive Engineering Foundations, Rome, Italy, September 30-October 1, 2003.

“Virtual Learning Platforms,” TRAM - European Trade Management Transnational Meeting, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, September 20, 2003.

“Learning in Networks,” Seminar of the European Institute for the Knowledge Economy (EIKE), Poitiers, France, June 26, 2003.

“E-Learning,” 11th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 2003), Naples, Italy, June 16-21, 2003.
“Dynamics of KM, Learning and Innovation Environments,” Antwerp University E-Business Chair, Antwerp, Belgium, March 26, 2003.
“Leadership in the Knowledge Society: What is Really new in the New Economy?” Cambridge IS Forum – UKAIS Joint Research Seminar Series, Judge Institute of Management Studies (JMIS), Cambridge, UK, February 6, 2003.
“Open Source Communities Reflecting Co-opetitive Learning and Knowledge Exchange Networks” (with Claudia Loebbecke), INSEAD Working Paper, November 2003.
"Business Navigator: The Next Generation of Management Development Tools,"
2002
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:

“Collaboration, Governance, and Technology in Inter-Organizational Learning Networks: Evidence from a Cross-Case Analysis” (with M. Gibbert and K. Nicolopoulou), Proceedings of 4th Triple Helix Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, November 6-9, 2002.

Towards Personalized, Socially Aware and Active Knowledge Management Systems” (with Thierry Nabeth and C. Roda), Brian Stanford-Smith, Enrica Chiozza and Mireille Edin (eds.), Proceedings of E-business and E-work - Challenges and Achievements in E-business and E-work, Volume 2, IOS Press, Amsterdam 2002, pp. 884-891, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
“CoP Workshop (Value Creation with Communities of Practice),” Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, December 18-19, 2002 (organized with CALT & CIFS).
“Towards Personalized, Socially Aware and Active Knowledge Management Systems,” eBusiness and eWork Conference (E-2002) Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, October 16-18, 2002.

“KM: The Change Management Challenge,” Knowledge Management Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, July 26, 2002 (with RISE Research Centre)

“Using conversational agents to support the adoption of knowledge sharing practices,” 12th EncKompass Research Workshop (with Université Paris-Dauphine), Paris, France, June 28-29, 2002 (also co-hosted this workshop).
“L'entrepreneur dans un monde virtuel, ” Expo Nationale Suisse, Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland, June 13, 2002.
E-Camp, at EC Brussels, May 16, 2002.
“Leadership in the Knowledge Society,” Strategic Planning Society Seminar, London, UK, April 8, 2002.
“Virtual Learning Platform and Collaborative Learning,” ETM - European Trade Management Forum, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, March 12-13, 2002.
"CALT, Director's Research & Development Report," May 2002.
2001
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :
Designing Virtual Communities to Support E-Commerce Adoption” (with Thierry Nabeth and Brian Subirana), Brian Stanford-Smith and Enrica Chiozza (eds.), E-work and E-commerce: Novel Solutions and practices for a global networked economy, vol. 2, IOS Press, Amsterdam 2001.

"Getting to 'yes' with the business management plan" (with Joe Tabet), in: Mastering management 2.0: your single-source guide to becoming a master of management (Ed., James Pickford), Financial Times Ltd, Pearson Education, 2001, chapter 2, p.33.

  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:

C-VIBE: a virtual interactive business environment addressing change management learning” (with Thierry Nabeth), Toshio Okamoto, Roger Hartley, Kinshuk, John P. Klus, Advanced Learning Technologies, Issues, Achievement, and Challenges, Madison, Wisconsin, 6-8 August 2001, IEE Computer Society Press, p. 174-177.

K-InCA: Using Artificial Agents to Help People Learn and Adopt New Behaviors” (with Thierry Nabeth, L. Razmerita and C. Roda), Proceedings of ICALT 2001, August 6-8, 2001, Madison, WI, USA.

Conversational Agents for Advanced Learning: Applications and Research” (with C. Roda, and Thierry Nabeth), Proceedings of BotShow 2001, June 27, 2001, Paris, France.
Towards personalized, socially aware and active e-learning systems: illustrated with the agent-based system K-InCA” (with C. Roda, and Thierry Nabeth), CALT White Paper, November 2001.
“Virtual Learning Communities: From E-Learning to C-Learning," 28th International Small Business Congress, Stockholm, Sweden, September 17, 2001.
“C-VIBE: A Virtual Interactive Business Environment addressing Change Management Learning,” and “K-InCA: Using Artificial Agents to Help People Learn and Adopt New Behaviors,” IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (I-CALT 2001), Madison, Wisconsin, USA, August 6-8, 2001.
“New technology and learning,” 20th EAPM European Congress & Exhibition on Human Resources Management, Geneva, Switzerland, June 27, 2001.
“Conversational Agents for Advanced Learning: Applications and Research,” Bot Show 2001, Paris, France, June 14, 2001.
“Nouvelle économie : Cyber Entrepreneurs,” Conference, Marrakesh, Morocco, May 31, 2001.
“B2B Workshop (2nd Virtual Product Development Workshop),” Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, May 17, 2001 (with CALT).
“E-Learning Experience Programme,” Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, April 23-24, 2001 (with CALT & EFMD).
“The New Economy and Cyber Entrepreneurship: Innovation in the Information Age,” IT Executive Forum 2001, Helsinki, Finland, February 28, 2001.
“eBusiness Challenges Workshop (1st Virtual Product Development Workshop),” Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, February 8-9, 2001 (with CALT).
Matching Competencies to Enhance Organizational Knowledge Sharing: An Intelligent Agents Approach” (with Thierry Nabeth and C. Roda), Proceedings of 7th International Netties Conference, September 2001, Fribourg, Switzerland.

Presentation of the “Centre for Advanced Learning Technologies (CALT) of the European Institute of Business Administration (INSEAD),” (with Thierry Nabeth L. Razmerita and C. Roda), Proceedings of the IHM-HCI 2001 Conference, September 2001, Lille France, pp. 87-88, volume 2.

“C-VIBE: A Virtual Interactive Business Environment addressing Change Management Learning” (with Thierry Nabeth), Proceedings of ICALT 2001, August 6-8, 2001, Madison, WI, USA.
2000
  • Press articles:

Getting to ‘Yes’ with the Business Plan” (with J. Tabet), Mastering Management, The Financial Times, December 4, 2000, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
“The Secret of Companies Built to Last,” Futuract World Business Forum 2000, Paris, France, December 19-20, 2000.
“Designing Mature Internet Strategies,” International Financial Services Conference, Brussels, Belgium, October 11, 2000.
“Nouvelle Economie et CyberEntrepreneurship,” Congrès 2000 de l’Ordre des Experts-Comptables et de la Compagnie Nationale des Commissaires aux Comptes, Palais des Congrès, Paris, France, September 28, 2000.
“How to get deep customer relationships in a digital world,” Strategic E-Commerce Day on Customer Relationship on the Net, Zürich, Switzerland, May 17, 2000.
“Internet – le commerce électronique,” Partners Conference, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, May 11, 2000.
“Knowledge Management,” Conference on Knowledge Management in the Public Sector, Ministry of Finance, Copenhagen, Denmark, March 14, 2000.
“Competing in the Information Age,” Antwerp University E-Business Chair, Antwerp, Belgium, February 15, 2000.
1999
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:

A Conceptual Framework for Assessing Development Programmes for Change Agents,” (with J.E.M. Atherton), Proceedings of ECIS Conference, Copenhagen, June 1999.

“Regards sur le futur : journée d’un entrepreneur ; défis pour l’entrepreneur,” Convention APM 1999, Poitiers, France, November 19, 1999.
“Learning in the Information Age: Research and Experiences,” 9th Annual BIT Conference 1999, Manchester, U.K., November 3-4, 1999.
“Learning and Knowledge Management in the Digital Millennium,” Seminar on Learning and Knowledge Management in the Digital Millennium, Stockholm, Sweden, October 22, 1999.

“Managing the Third Millennium: Learning and Knowledge Management in the Digital Age,” Annual EFMD Conference (Building new connections: preparing managers for a different world), Edinburgh, U.K., June 27-29, 1999.

“Strategic Implications of the Internet and Electronic Commerce,” HEC Executive Forum, Jouy-en-Josas, France, June 10, 1999.
1998
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

Case-Based Decision Support” (with Soumitra Dutta), Communications of the ACM, May 1998, vol. 41, No. 5, pp. 157-165, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

Understanding Organizational Dynamics of IT-Enabled Change: A Multimedia Simulation Approach” (with Jean-François Manzoni), Journal of Management Information Systems, 14, 3, Winter 1997-1998, pp. 109-140, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Press articles:
Towards the high-tech, high-touch website,” Mastering Marketing, The Financial Times, November 9, 1998, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
“Knowledge Management: beyond the ‘Hype’,” EBC Conference on Knowledge Management, Copenhagen, Denmark, September 9-10, 1998.
“Communautés Virtuelles d'Apprentissage, ” Workshop, Le Préau, Paris, France, July 3, 1998.
“Understanding Organizational Dynamics of IT-Enabled Change: A Multimedia Simulation Approach,” 9th Annual Meeting of the EURO DSS Group, Granada, Spain, May 21-24, 1998.
“Learning Technologies: A European Perspective,” “Beyond the Web: Designing Learning Environments in Virtual Worlds,” and “Multimedia Simulations for Teaching Change Management and Overcoming Resistance to IT/IS in Organizations,” 31st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS’98, Hawaii, USA, January 7, 1998.
“Technology for Synchronous Learning,” 31st Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS’98, Hawaii, USA, January 6, 1998. (with Jay Nunamaker and Robert Briggs).
1997
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

Designing Mature Internet Strategies: The ICDT Model,” European Management Journal, 15, 4, 1997, pp. 361-369, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

Leveraging Emerging Technologies in Management Education: Research and Experiences” (with Thierry Nabeth), European Management Journal, 15, 3, 1997, pp. 275-285, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

An Agent-Centered Framework for the Analysis and Diagnosis of Organizational Groupware Platforms,” in Design of Computing Systems: Cognitive Considerations, G. Salvendy et al. (eds.), Elsevier, 1997, pp. 289-292, (pdf, via INSEAD library).

This article previously appeared in: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 1997, pp. 655 - 664.

"EIS Simulation Trainer Manual," INSEAD, 1997.
Catching Customers on the Web” (with J.-L. Barsoux), Mastering Enterprise, Part 4: Getting Started, pp. 135-140, The Financial Times Pitman Publishing, 1997.
Developing Mature Internet Strategies: Insights from the Banking Sector” (with Jens Meyer), Information Systems Management, 14, 3, 1997, pp. 37-43, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Press articles:
“Catching the customers on the Web” (with J.-L. Barsoux), The Financial Times, January 20, 1997, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
The ICDT Model: Towards a Taxonomy of Internet-related Business Strategies,” 97/12, INSEAD/CALT Working Paper 5, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
“Understanding Organizational Implications of Change Processes: A Multimedia Simulation Approach,” (with Jean-François Manzoni), 30th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS’97, Hawaii, January 7-10, 1997.

“Change Management Workshop,” Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, March 7, 1997.

“Leveraging Multimedia and Groupware in Business” (with Tawfik Jelassi), IFORS-SPC2 Conference, Bruges, Belgium, March 24, 1997.
“Customization or Sophistication? Towards mature Internet business strategies,” Perspective Europe: Customer-Driven Management Conference, Paris, April 17, 1997.

“Selection Criteria for Selling Products Online - what, how, why and how much?” Business On-Line 97 Symposium, London, UK, April 28-30, 1997.

“CyberBusiness: From Tinkering to Maturity,” Annual Conference of the Spanish Direct Marketing Association (AEMD), Barcelona, Spain, May 28, 1997.

“Virtual Learning Spaces: Design & Experiences,” AACSB/EFMD New Learning Technologies Workshop, Boston, USA , May 29-31, 1997.

“From Tinkering to Maturity: From Multimedia Cases to Advanced Business Simulations,” AACSB/EFMD New Learning Technologies Workshop, Boston, USA, May 29-31, 1997.

“The World-Class Internet Workshop,” CALT & IESE Workshop, INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France, June 19-20, 1997.

“The Strategic Implications of the Internet,” Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Information Systems, Volume III, 1997, pp. 1163-1173.
“The Strategic Implications of the Internet: An Agent-Based Framework,” 5th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 97), Cork, Ireland, June 19-21, 1997.

“An Agent-centered Framework for the Analysis and Diagnosis of Organizational Groupware Platforms,” HCI‘97 Conference, San Francisco, USA, August 24-29, 1997.

“IT Strategies in the Information Age: From Tinkering to Maturity” (with Pankaj Ghemawat, HBS and Ben Bensaou, INSEAD), Business Strategy 1997 Conference, Tokyo, Japan, September 18-19, 1997.

“Internet Strategies: European Experiences and Best Practices,” Association of North-Italian CEOs (Assolombarda), Milan, Italy, October 24, 1997.

“Interactive Digital Entertainment: Interactive Movies and beyond” (with A. Giffin), CALT Report, January 1997.
Intranets: The Backbone of Corporate Market Spaces” (with Nicholas Leck), CALT Report, June 1997.
“CIIA Virtual Learning & Knowledge Platform,” CALT Report, July 1997.
Understanding Organizational Implications of Change Processes: A Multimedia Simulation Approach” (with Jean François Manzoni), Proceedings of the Thirtieth Annual Hawaii International Conference on Systems Sciences, vol. II, IEEE Computer Society Press, 1997, pp. 655-664.
1996
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :
"EIS Simulation User Manual," INSEAD, (English Version) 1995-1997, (Italian Version) 1997, (French Version), 1996.
"A High-Tech Spin on Organizational Learning” (with Jean-François Manzoni), Chief Executive, April 1996, pp. 66-67, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Press articles:

“Bosses must learn to surf” (with J.-L. Barsoux), The Financial Times, November 15, 1996.

  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
“LeapNet: A groupware-based Learning Experience” (with Jean-François Manzoni, and P. Wagenaar), CALT Report, April 1996.
Business Implications of Multimedia: The Case of Spain” (with A. Lozano), 96/10, INSEAD/CALT Working Paper 2.
Technology-Enhanced Management Education: Conceptual Framework and Experiences with Advanced Telecom-Computer Integrated Technology” (with Thierry Nabeth), 96/36, INSEAD/CALT Working Paper 3.
“Leveraging Advanced Technologies for Learning,” 4th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS 96), Lisbon, Portugal, July 4, 1996.

“Advanced Learning Technologies: Research and Practice,” Workshops, SDA Bocconi University, Milan, Italy, May 30-31 and October 21-22, 1996.

“Competing in the Information Age: Groupware, Multimedia & Electronic Commerce,” ITiMA Conference, Malmo, Sweden, April 16, 1996.
“Competing in the Information Age,” European Direct Marketing Association (EDMA) Conference, Brussels, Belgium, April 11, 1996.

“Leveraging Groupware and Internet for Learning,” European Community-LILIS Conference, Genova, Italy, March 25, 1996.

“The Impact of Technology on Teaching and Learning,” European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Deans and Directors 1996 Annual Meeting, Amsterdam, Netherlands, January 12, 1996.
1995
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

“Business navigator: the next generation of management development tools” (with Yves Doz, and J.E.M. Atherton, Focus, No. 1, pp. 24-31, 1995.

  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
Le multimédia au service de l’enseignement de la gestion, l’exemple de l’INSEAD,” Les Annales de l’Ecole de Paris, vol. II, pp. 285-292, 1995 (in French).
"Groupware in Education” (with P. Wagenaar), CALT Report, February 1995.
“Competing in the Information Age,” Annual Conference of the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), London, UK, December 8, 1995.
“Learning Technologies for Management Education,” Workshop for the Faculty of Hernstein International Management Institute, Vienna, November 14, 1995.
“Who manages information? Experiences and Trends,” Annual Conference of the European Association of Information Services (Eusidic), Amsterdam, Netherlands, October 18, 1995.
“Technology as Driver of Change - What Does the Future Hold?” and “Technology as an Enabler - A Hands-on Experience of How IT Can Leverage Learning,” 1995 EFMD Annual Conference “Management Development: Creating the Future,” Athens, Greece, June 17, 1995.
“Information Superhighways: Emerging Technologies and their Impact on Society, Firms and Management,” 6th Annual Conference of the Greek Association of CEOs, Athens, Greece, June 13, 1995 (with Spyros Makridakis).
“Information Superhighways: Business Challenges and Opportunities,” Euroforum Spanish CEO Meeting, El Escorial, Spain, May 13, 1995.
1994
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

DSS Research and Practice in Perspective” (with T. Jelassi), Decision Support Systems: The International Journal, 12, 1994, pp. 267-275.

  • Press articles:
"Multimedia comes to the business school," Financial Times, December 21, 1994, (pdf, via INSEAD library).
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:

“New technologies and Advances in Case Teaching,” EFMD Workshop, Sheffield, UK, September 9, 1994.

“Business Navigator: The next generation of Management Development Tools,” 3rd Conference of the International Research Network for Training and Development, Milan, June 23-25, 1994.
1993
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

Computers that criticize you: Stimulus-based Decision Support Systems,” Interfaces, 23, 3, 1993, pp. 3-16.

  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
Business Navigator: The Next Generation of Management Development Tools” (with Yves Doz and J. Atherton), 93/37, INSEAD/CALT Working Paper 1.
1992
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

Stimulus Agents: An alternative Framework for Computer-aided Decision Making,” DSS-92 Transactions, M. Silver (ed.), The Institute of Management Sciences, 1992, pp. 81-92.

Integrating Case-Based Reasoning in Multi-Criteria Decision Support Systems” (with Soumitra Dutta), Decision Support Systems: Experiences and Expectations, T. Jelassi et al. (eds.), Elsevier, North-Holland, 1992, pp. 133-150.
Supporting Multicriteria Decision Making: New Perspectives and Systems,” Executive Information Systems and Decision Support, C. Holtham (ed.), Chapman & Hall, 1992, pp. 125-141.
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
“Stimulus Agents: New Research Directions in Computer-aided Decision Making,” London School of Economics, London, November 20, 1992.
“Supporting Decision Framing through Multiple Representations” (with Anil Gaba), ORSA/TIMS Conference, San Francisco, November 1992.

“The Conversational Framework for Decision Support (CFDS),” Université de Paris Dauphine, Paris, June 18, 1992.

“Integrating Case-based Reasoning in Multicriteria DSS” (with Soumitra Dutta), IFIP 8.3 Conference, Fontainebleau, June 1992.

“Stimulus Agents: An alternative Framework for Computer-aided Decision Making,” DSS-92 Conference, Chicago, June 10, 1992.
1991
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

Designing Humanized Systems for Multiple Criteria Decision Making,” Human Systems Management, 10, 3, 1991, pp. 221-232.

Modeling by Example: A Link between Users, Models and Methods in DSS,” European Journal of Operational Research, 55, 1991, pp. 293-305.
Triple C: Visual Interaction for Individual and Group Decision Support,” Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Multimedia and Networking Paradigm, Unicom, Uxbridge, UK, 1991, pp. 101-109.
Triple C: A Visual Interactive MCDSS,” Software-Ergonomie '91, M. Rauterberg and E. Ulich (eds.), IfAP, 1991, pp. 5-16
  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
“Learning-versus Solving-oriented Decision Support,” University of Geneva, Geneva, November 14, 1991.
“Supporting Multicriteria Decision Making: New Research Perspectives,” Université de Paris Dauphine, Paris, November 12, 1991.
“Human-Computer Interaction Design in Collaborative DSS,” ORSA/TIMS Conference, Anaheim, CA, November 1991.

“Visual Interaction for Individual and Group Decision Support,” Brunel University Conference Centre, London, July 16, 1991.

“Visual Interaction: A step towards Humanized Decision Support Systems,” IFORS-SPC1 Conference, Bruges, March 27, 1991.
“Decision Support Systems: Research and Practice” (with Tawfik Jelassi), IFORS-SPC1 Conference, Bruges, March 26, 1991.
1990
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :

Intelligent Decision Support Systems: A Visual Interactive Approach” (with H.-J. Lüthi), Interfaces, 20, 6, 1990, pp. 17-28.

Visual Interactive Modelling & Intelligent DSS: Putting Theory into Practice” (with H.-J. Lüthi), DSS-90 Transactions, L. Volonino (ed.), The Institute of Management Sciences, 1990, pp. 78-89.
"Visual Decisions with Triple C," User Manual, 1990.

A Context-Oriented Approach for Decision Support” (with M. Arnoldi, H.-J. Lüthi and D. Ackermann), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 439, Springer-Verlag, 1990, pp. 137-148.

  • Conference presentations / working papers / reports:
“Supporting Multicriteria Decision Making: New Perspectives and Systems,” Proceedings of the First International Society of Decision Support Systems Conference, Austin, TX, 1990, pp. 521-535.
Triple C: A Visual Interactive MCDSS,” INSEAD working paper, 1990.
Software-Ergonomie '91, M. Rauterberg and E. Ulich (eds.), IfAP, 1991, pp. 5-16
1989
  • Journal articles / books & book chapters :
"Modeling by Example: Neue Wege zur Entscheidungsunterstützung mittels interaktiver Modellierung," Diss. ETH Nr. 8864, Juris Verlag, 1989 (in German).
“Entwicklung entscheidungsunterstützender Systeme: Das Beispiel Tolomeo” (with H.-J. Lüthi), OUTPUT, 12, 1989, pp. 29-35 (in German).

Welcome to our lab!

CEDEP's

Inter-Organizational Learning and Collaboration 2.0

Animated by Albert A. Angehrn, this new lab regroups the professor's most recent INSEAD research.

The purpose of the new Inter-Organizational Learning and Collaboration 2.0, launched in 2008 by Professor Angehrn, is to propose corporate partnerships with a view to advancing research in the field of inter-organizational collaborative learning dynamics, and in particular the deployment and impact of advanced web 2.0 concepts and systems in such inter-organizational contexts.

Background:

While the concept of inter-organizational learning and collaboration is not new, that which is new is the increasing predominance of virtual versus real interaction. More and more information technology is being used to facilitate learning in networks whose members are globally dispersed.

However, this poses significant challenges in terms of issues such as “direct touch,” building trust, capturing members' attention, and sustaining learning.

While IT has been very successful in enabling new forms of distributed, collaborative learning and knowledge creation in the software development realm (e.g., open-source communities), its promise in contexts other than software development is still an open question.

Evidence suggests that the vast majority of IT-based knowledge management networks and communities fail to thrive because they do not take sufficiently into account the emotional, psychological and social needs of individuals.

New features which provide user value are those helping members find relevant material and those supporting their social exchanges.

Particularly needed today is indeed the ability to generate “connections” between people — in addition to the traditional knowledge management functionalities normally found in such systems — and thus give users more opportunities to engage in informal knowledge exchange with others, and stimulate them to actively participate in sharing and building on each other’s knowledge and experience.

In order to address this issue, Professor Angehrn, at INSEAD, has developed an online environment which supports knowledge exchange, learning and collaboration and which can be adapted to various domains.

It is based on the latest web 2.0 trends that make extensive use of video, profiling, game dynamics, agents and network visualizations so as to capture the attention and involvement of the learning community members by generating three different types of user value: connection value, actionable learning value, as well as entertainment and instant gratification value.

An important key concept underlying its design is that it also generates the necessary data (log files) to allow researchers to assess platform usage and to evaluate system benefits along these three user value dimensions.

Specific projects may include:

  1. Identification of relevant and representative inter-organizational contexts within the target organization, such as : the community of top HR managers of the member companies ; the participants of an important modular course; the alumni community
  2. Adaptation and injection of advanced collaborative learning and knowledge exchange systems resulting from Professor Angehrn's latest INSEAD research in order to achieve a real impact within the targeted communities in terms of quantity and quality of inter-organizational connections and exchanges
  3. Documentation of the impact and dynamics, analysis of the data and evidence collected, thus creating an enhanced overall learning experience and sharing of insights gained, as well as maintaining and extending the impact achieved

And, concrete proposals might take shape as follows :

  • Regular Learning Innovation Workshops in Fontainebleau (4 per Year), allowing participants to:
    • stay in touch with latest developments/insights/trends
    • partake in inter-organizational exchanges related to management learning innovations
  • Online Community memberships; supervision from Professor Angehrn and appointment of responsible research team members (diffusion, deployment and impact targets)
  • Company-specific deployment opportunities studies and internal facilitators’ training/certification
  • Company-specific injection projects & impact/evidence studies
  • Company-specific innovation projects or advanced R&D partnerships -- as with the example of the newly launched CEDEP Living Lab

For further information: contact Albert A. Angehrn

Conferences

conferences

Here below are all the details about Professor Angehrn's recent conferences, 2008-2009.
Change management - Using simulations to better understand the dynamics behind change, collaboration and innovation in global business - Cannes, France, October 29th, 2009 - IATTO Forum “Managing Change in Turbulent Times”

Invitation at www.iatto.org (Special invitation for INSEAD alumni)

Inter-Organizational Learning and Competence Development: Web 2.0 Experiences and Trends - Fontainebleau (CEDEP campus), France, December 10-12, 2009

Invitation
Change Management Simulations™: Experiences for successful change, collaboration and innovation - Stockholm, Sweden, September 1st, 2009

Invitation to this Alpha Experiences Change Management workshop event, led by Albert A. Angehrn and featuring the EIS Simulation (Special invitation for INSEAD alumni)

IT Innovation in a Downturn Economy - FINAKI ICT 2009 meeting for European CIOs, Treviso, Italy, June 11, 2009

Program event brochure (in Italian) : Crescere con la crisi: semplificare, cambiare, transformare l'IT

Albert A. Angehrn: Keynote speaker at this annual national gathering of the European CIO community, organized by FINAKI Italia.

"Frontiers of Top Management Development" - Copenhagen, January 29, 2009

download brochure for this event

"Innovation & Collaboration 2.0" - Future Capital World Summit - Abu Dhabi, January 14, 2009
Dr. Florian Schloderer, CALT Research Fellow in Abu Dhabi, presents, on behalf of Professor Angehrn, an overview of CALT's pedagogical approach of "learning by playing," entitled: "Innovation & Collaboration 2.0"
ITM Worldwide Change Management Simulation Seminar - Lidköping, Sweden, November 27, 2008

A Change Management Simulation Seminar (led by Professor Angehrn), examining the challenges of leading and implementing change management, as well as the latest studies and theories in change management thinking.

ChangeMasters Middle East - 2nd Workshop - Abu Dhabi, November 17, 2008

download the INSEAD Global Events Calendar announcement and the workshop invitation

Featured: the EIS Simulation learning experience

"Comment conduire le changement dans les rédactions?" - Club SPMI (Syndicat de la Presse, Magazine et d'Information), Paris, November 14, 2008

Presentation (in French), Club SPMI (Syndicat de la Presse, Magazine et d'Information), Friday, November 14, 2008, Salons Hoche, Paris.

Round table debate led by Christophe Barbier, Editorial Director of the magazine, l'Express.

ChangeMasters Middle East - 5th Congress of Scientific Research Outlook in the Arab World Conference - Fez, Morocco, October 26-30, 2008

download program and paper (with Florian Schloderer and Alicia Cheak, and presented by Florian Schloderer): "Training for Change and Innovation Management Competencies in Middle-Eastern Organizations - A Multi-Media Simulation Approach"

ChangeMasters Middle East - 1st Workshop - Abu Dhabi, August 24, 2008

download the INSEAD Abu Dhabi Centre project summary

ChangeMasters workshop invitation (sent by Zeina Sleiman)

ChangeMasters Middle East project

"A one-day expert workshop: ChangeMasters Middle East

Sunday, August 24, 2008 – 09AM—05:00PM INSEAD Abu Dhabi Centre

ChangeMasters Middle East is a new INSEAD research and development project aimed at creating an innovative learning simulation that perfectly meets the requirements of Middle Eastern organizations in today’s world.

The workshop in Abu Dhabi marked the launch of this new INSEAD R&D project that seeks to bring the INSEAD/CALT EC ChangeMasters project to a setting in the Middle East, as it adapts the EIS simulation to this specific cultural context.

Dr. Florian Schloderer, our INSEAD Research Fellow in Abu Dhabi, led (on behalf of Professor Albert Angerhn) the first workshop on August 24, 2008.

The ChangeMasters Middle East workshop experience

  • Participants were able to learn about the latest research on change and innovation management, and exchange experiences and best practices (EIS simulation workshop).
  • At the same time, the input from participants is helping our CALT team to validate knowledge on change and innovation management that will serve as a solid basis for the development of new, customized management simulations for Middle Eastern organizations.

ECLF, The Future of Leadership and Leadership Learning - Madrid, Spain, July 2-4, 2008 - hosted by the Santander Group

download list of participants and speakers

presentation by Professor Angehrn

4th Annual European Corporate Learning Forum Conference

The Future of Leadership and Leadership Learning

Presentation: "Utilizing Immersive Interactive Rich Media Platforms for Advanced Leadership Learning,"

Abstract:

Professor Angehrn provides an overview of the work done in INSEAD’s Centre for Advanced Learning Technologies, CALT. He proposes a conceptual foundation for change leadership and learning. Participants experience the power of virtual solutions by actively playing 2 game-based learning solutions that have been developed by CALT, and they also have the opportunity to commence playing one of the games in advance, before the meeting, thus allowing them to experience and discuss distributed collaborative decision processes.

Game Hostile Environments, Serious Games on the Move Conference- Angela Ruskin's University, Cambridge, UK, June 23, 2008

download conference topics and list of speakers

Professor Angehrn's video presentation: "Game Hostile Environments" (n°7 on list)

Held in the historic city of Cambridge, this conference was the first in a planned series of international conferences on serious games, i.e., game software applications that are designed to do more than entertain.
Dynamics of Change and Innovation, Swedish Business Awards 2008 - Vilnius, Lithuania, June 11, 2008
Change Management Simulations Experience - Worldwide Launch
NALEN, Stockholm, March 12, 2008

download videos and slides

download invitation to event

Interviews

CNN(International).com, Executive Education, online article featuring the EagleRacing simulation (pdf)

"Inner circle" series of Economist Intelligence Unit articles published by the Economist.com in 2009 (pdf); (initial interview done by Clint Witchalls on June 6, 2007, for the Economist Intelligence Unit)

INSEAD Knowledge article, December 2008 (pdf)

ICT Results interview (pdf)

Bilan interview (pdf)

  • "Serious Games" (by Cyril Jost, Bilan No.250, 21.05.08, in French)

Tackling business problems with online games

LONDON, England (CNN) --

Picture this: You work for a racing car company that needs to raise $18 million in sponsorship. Do you go with a reliable sponsor that can only offer part of that sum, or take the full $18 million from a company getting bad press for selling arms to a Middle Eastern country?

That's the scenario of "Eagle Racing," a video-based business simulation designed to teach collaborative decision making.

It was developed at the Center for Advanced Learning Technologies (CALT), run by business school INSEAD, and it's an example of the kind of simulation used by business schools and companies wanting employees to hone their business acumen.

Business simulations have been around since the 1950s, starting out as little more than business-themed board games. But as technology has improved, simulations have become increasingly sophisticated and widespread.

Realistic simulations can teach general skills, like decision making, or allow participants to try their hand at all manner of specific business disciplines, be it finance, accounting, marketing or human resources.

Dr Annette Halpin is Vice President of the US-based Association for Business Simulation and Experiential Learning, and chair of Business/Health Administration and Economics at Arcadia University in Pennsylvania. She says that computer-based business simulations are now widely used on MBA courses.

"Simulations are becoming increasingly important in business education because they create a reality for students that can't be taught by textbooks," she told CNN.

But simulations aren't only used by business schools -- they are equally in demand with companies wanting to arm employees with new skills.

BTS is an international company that produces simulations for clients including Coca Cola, Procter & Gamble and ING.

Willem Pennings, a Senior Consultant at BTS, told CNN that businesses approach BTS to request custom-made simulations that replicate the way their business functions or that teach specific skills. A custom-made BTS simulation can cost a business anywhere between $500,000 and $800,000.

While the exact nature of any simulation depends on a company's requirements, Pennings says they are often designed to give participants a holistic view of their business, allowing executives to experience how other departments function, without having to actually work in those departments.

He gives the example of a simulation that lets someone who works in marketing make financial decisions so that they develop a better understand budgeting issues.

According to Pennings the advantage of simulations over other teaching methods is that they let users apply the theoretical knowledge they have learned. And he says the economic downturn has benefited BTS as businesses focus on training their staff to be more efficient and more aware of profitability.

Professor Albert Angehrn works at CALT, in Paris, where he develops interactive technology for management training. The simulations developed at CALT are widely used in business schools and by companies including IBM and BMW.

"Simulations are seen as an important component of management development because they put people directly into a scenario, and that means there is stress and emotion," he says.

Angehrn says that business simulations have traditionally taught more quantitative skills -- for example a finance or marketing simulation might allow participants to work out how much money should be allocated to advertising.

But now simulations have been refined to teach more "soft skills," addressing people dynamics, such as driving change in organizations and making companies more collaborative.

He adds that while simulations are suitable for individual learning, their real value comes when they are carried out in groups, with participants from different disciplines working together and sharing knowledge.

The internet has revolutionized the way business simulations are used. Where an administrator once had to manually input the participants' in-game decisions into a computer, users can now input their own decisions online. Online simulations allow employees from different companies to take part in the same simulation and can add an extra dimension to online MBA courses.

Angerhn says there is a trend towards "massive" online simulations that allow hundreds of users to simultaneously participate in a scenario. He says these are popular with big organizations, such as IKEA, that want to rapidly increase know-how across the company.

As for the future, Halpin thinks that business simulations will become more immersive, incorporating the visual elements of virtual worlds like Second Life. That could provide an even more realistic experience, and if the old adage is to be believed, experience is the best teacher.

Enabling Business Flexibility

All change

Companies spend millions of dollars on new systems, and are then surprised when no one wants to use them. If organizations were run by robots, implementing change would be easy; humans, however, are tricky creatures to deal with. Millions of years of evolution have primed us to regard change with suspicion and fear. While a new enterprise resource planning (ERP) system is hardly the same threat as a sabre-toothed tiger, our fight or flight response when faced with something new is hard wired. Even the most benign change triggers some form of resistance, so it is surprising that change management is often treated as an afterthought, a mere tick-box labeled“provide training.”

There are a number of reasons why change initiatives fail: insufficient executive support, unrealistic expectations, ineffective leadership, and so on. But according to Albert Angehrn, professor of information technology and entrepreneurship at business school INSEAD, the biggest cause of failure is resistance to change. “The capability to identify and address different types of resistance is therefore a key competence which is unfortunately not very well-spread,” he says. This may explain why more than seven out of ten change initiatives fail .

Habituating people to something new takes time and repetition. Of course, in the change curve, there are the 10% of early adopters who do not need much convincing, there are the 10% who will never accept the change, no matter what you do, but that still leaves the 80% in the middle who need to be persuaded. The important point in addressing the 80% in the middle is not to treat them as one undifferentiated mass.

Know your audience

Carmel McConnell, author of Change Activist: Make Big Things Happen Fast, says that people’s intelligence is often discounted at the beginning of change programmes by senior managers. “Their view is that I can get my career boosted if I get this project in on time and budget,” she says. “If I can get everyone else to not completely rebel, then that would be wonderful because that would be better than the last change effort.”

Companies need to have enough respect for their employees and other stakeholders to take the time to explain why the change is happening, even if there is not much in it for them. Ms McConnell says that if you want to engage people you have got to be honest.

It is important to consider every group affected by the change and to tailor your message accordingly. A customer is likely to view your new customer relationship management (CRM) system differently from an end-user, who will again see it differently from a C-level executive.

Organizations need to decide what they want from each stakeholder group, whether it is their involvement, their buy-in or simply whether they need to be informed. For change to be successful the communication should be personal and inclusive.

At a different level, change leads to stress, and too much stress leads to people walking out the door. Forward-thinking firms (particularly investment banks and bio-technology companies) have come to realize that if they get the best people and keep the best people, that talent will drive their unique selling proposition. But to attract and retain the best people, you have to treat them with respect, and that includes involving them in change from the outset.

Looking beyond carrots and sticks

Having the right environment to try things out can often go a long way to alleviating fear. Researchers – and, more recently, companies – have discovered that simulation games can provide a safe haven for exploring change before it happens.

At INSEAD, Professor Angehrn has been studying the role of simulation and games in managing change.

For more than ten years now I have been a strong believer that the best way of learning for managers is learning-by-doing (experiential learning) and that the next frontier in experiential learning is learning-by-playing, which adds a collaborative dimension to both learning and action,” he says.

Of course, when you roll-out the finished product – whether a new system, new process or both – the recipients of the change will still meet a number of unintended consequences, but at least they will be more ready and willing to give it a go.

But using simulations and games is not just some ivory-tower exercise; it is starting to be accepted as an effective way to manage change in the corporate world. IKEA has used a simulation tool from INSEAD to successfully support its largest change management projects related to the redesign of their global supply chain processes. The same applies to the FIAT Group, the largest Italian industrial group which had to undergo extreme changes over the last few years.

Even in the public sector, games addressing change management are starting to be used more extensively. A good example is the Scottish Executive, which has used simulations for some years to provide decision makers in the public sector with advanced change management competencies.

Professor Angehrn says that simulation games for addressing change management are emerging as an effective way to help managers understand and master complex organizational interventions. The games give change managers first hand experience of how difficult it is to segue from strategy to implementation. It gives them a chance to try different strategies and management tactics to smoothly introduce change and innovation when faced with different forms of resistance, from defensiveness to apathy. It also gives them an insight into how ideas spread through an organization– change in organizations does not take place linearly, but spreads like epidemics – and the political insight of dealing with informal networks of power.

For successful change to happen, companies do not have to deploy high-tech solutions like the computer simulations, but “learning by doing” should still form a big part of any change initiative. Knowing and interacting with what you are dealing with helps to overcome resistance, especially if the change comes from outside the organization, such as through a merger or acquisition. Remember, change becomes hard wired when personal insight occurs, so provide a safe test environment where those “ah-ha” moments can flourish. But even with this all in place, do not expect change to be easy.

Effecting change management: a reality with the LingHe Simulation?

-- Karen Cho, INSEAD Knowledge, December 2008

With China’s business environment undergoing fast and significant change – partially driven by the introduction of information and communication technologies into business relationships – managers now need to be more effective than ever in implementing change within their organizations.

But just how effective are they? According to Albert A. Angehrn, INSEAD Professor of Information Technology and Director of the Centre for Advanced Learning Technologies (CALT), the truth is that the vast majority of change projects in organizations fail, some miserably. Failure in this case, he says, means that performance targets are not achieved, as new ways of operating are not integrated and adopted to the extent that would allow organizations to profit from them.

While there’s no lack of knowledge as to how to address change initiatives, Angehrn says we have not been successful in translating that knowledge into practice. We simply don’t know how to move from the relatively comfortable area of ‘knowing’ to one of actually ‘doing.’

Change is coming

This is further compounded with Chinese managers operating in China. China’s policy of economic reform has opened her markets to foreign trade and investment. The resulting increase in collaboration between Chinese and foreign managers has brought an interesting new dimension to learning how effectively to introduce innovation – and change – in culturally-mixed environments.

Chinese managers today are facing change on a scale and at a pace that have previously been unseen, and for which there exists little or no relevant past experience. Western managers are not exempt either, as they too need to adapt their managerial styles to better suit the Chinese context and environment.

Enter the LingHe Simulation, a computer-based interactive multimedia simulation that models the dynamics of organizational change in a typical Chinese business environment. Its purpose: to simulate real-life scenarios faced by Chinese and foreign managers who want, or need, to implement organizational change at China Inc.

Creating the LingHe Simulation

Modeled after the Executive Information System (EIS) Simulation, which has already been used extensively as a learning tool in MBA and corporate management training programmes in Western organizations, LingHe is unique in that it is tailor-made for the China market. More specifically, it is aimed at those responsible for introducing and implementing knowledge and innovation strategies in China. This includes CEOs, CIOs, general and project managers, heads of departments, and other key decision makers.

To authenticate the simulation, a framework for the company was constructed. Angehrn and his partners invented a fictitious business enterprise called the LingHe Company (LHC), a switching equipment manufacturer located in Changsha, the capital of Hunan province. The intention was to portray a company that was still relatively remote from Western influence, based in a region with a moderate pace of economic change so that the need for further change was not felt very strongly. The description of the company as moderately profitable further reduced any urgency to change.

However, a twist of fate saw LHC being sold to SinoCom, China’s largest national telecom operator. The move was intended to induce LHC to adopt managerial best practices and to consolidate the national telecom industry in the face of foreign competition. An employee from SinoCom has been dispatched to help LHC executives adopt its highly-regarded computer-based performance management system. An uphill task no less, especially when computer literacy, profitability and personal objectives are not yet standard operating procedures at LHC.

Therein lies the challenge of the simulation, a critical component being the influence tactics or initiatives that managers choose to convince the people in an organization during the process of adopting proposed changes. With no two organizations being identical, tactics that may work for one may be ineffective or counter-effective for another.

After conducting more than 100 interviews with top and middle-level Chinese business managers, 19 typical tactics for organizational change in China were shortlisted, and these would become the template for the simulation. The simulation was tested yet again, this time on both Chinese and Western managers in a series of four workshops held in Nanjing, Beijing and Europe.

Learning by mistakes

Besides being recognizable and realistic, Angehrn says the simulation also has to be challenging in order to “force” managers to make mistakes and avoid “quick-fix” solutions.

Though the simulation provides immediate feedback (positive, neutral or negative) following each decision taken, this unorthodox approach is not without its detractors. Angehrn notes some initial resistance by Chinese managers in particular, because the simulation does not correspond with traditional Chinese methods. His research has also revealed that people in higher positions were less willing to “play” along, as they would rather not fail in front of their subordinates. Most however, he says, gradually warmed to the “game” dimension, where making mistakes is permissible and even intended.

“Simulations are effective pedagogical tools. They are designed to make you fall into traps and make you aware of what you could do wrong. They show that you are going to fail so that we can discuss this and open up issues, and really understand where we can add value to develop further competencies,” he says.

“Now this approach is clearly exposing the individual, which in my belief is key for learning. If people are not put at their limit of their incompetence and realize that they can fail, they have no motivation to really learn. We try to advocate that it is only through failure that we can learn something.

“For instance, only through a simulation as LingHe, can managers fully realize that much of the resistance faced when implementing change is actually the indirect result of their own way of proceeding. Ultimately, they themselves are the ones generating the very resistance that kills their projects. It’s a very important insight that can only be fully understood through experiential learning approaches as the LingHe Simulation.”

The payoff

By and large, simulations can trump traditional learning tools and techniques, such as lectures, or even participating in short role-playing exercises, as they can capture a significantly higher level of complexity and create a life-like experience in a risk-free environment.

For example, of the 19 listed change tactics, the ‘task force’ tactic, which is often used in Western companies to engage selected individuals from within the organization as change agents, did not receive strong backing from the participating Chinese managers. This indicates that Chinese managers would not be active in appointing change agents or in wishing to be appointed to perform that role.

Similarly, the management training tactic is not used by Chinese managers, whereas it is widely used by Western managers.

The ‘electronic mail’ tactic, broadly used by Western managers, is also not popular with Chinese managers, who do not have the habit of checking their email frequently and are inclined to use traditional communication tools.

While the overall evaluation of the LingHe Simulation among groups of Chinese managers has consistently showed positive feedback regarding its realism, Angehrn says more substantive testing is required in order to validate further the use of the LingHe Simulation as a learning tool for Western managers who wish to introduce change in a Chinese environment.

Designing effective simulation games to address complex management subjects such as change, collaboration and innovation is one of the key challenges of INSEAD’s Centre for Advanced Learning Technologies (CALT). This activity goes hand in hand with the analysis of the impact, be it short or long-term, that such simulations have on the organizations which deploy them with their managers.

As an example, take for instance ChangeMasters, which was a large EC-funded study that CALT has recently completed on the impact of change management simulations on organizations as IKEA, the FIAT Group, and the Scottish Government. Similar studies are now ongoing that will serve to better understand and validate the impact of the “China-centered” LingHe simulation on increasing the change readiness of individual managers and organizations.”

Teaching experience

Business veterans claim you cannot teach ‘experience’, but European researchers say you can. The team developed software that helps players acquire real-life skills and realistic experiences through game playing. But this game is no executive toy.

The interactive software has caught the imagination of world-class business colleges in the USA and elsewhere and it has prompted enormous interest in Europe’s leading corporations. ChangeMasters represents an emerging shift in business education, based on realistic computer games.

Colleges and companies believe it gives students real-world skills through ‘experience’. “Experience is the best and simplest way to learn anything, that is why it is so valued in the business world,” explains Professor Albert Angehrn.

ChangeMasters focused on change management, one of the most important elements of modern business. Change is essential to responding to dynamic markets, consumers, competitors and innovation, and change is one of the most important themes in corporation history.

Protectionism was replaced by globalization, in-house departments to outsourcing, functional to process-oriented organization. Change is constant. Even housekeeping tasks, like moving to new computer systems, or daily business activities like new product development require changes to the way an organization works.

Executive games, seriously

But change is hard, rarely goes smoothly and often courts disaster. ChangeMasters plans to make the process easier by equipping executives with real-life skills and realistic project management experience using a serious game. Serious games attempt to achieve real-world results through video game technology.

The ChangeMasters game contains hundreds of parameters to define the corporation, its people and the project. “It defines the corporation’s character and culture, formal and informal networks, all the elements that compose the dynamics of an organization,” reveals Angehrn.

It can even represent Western, Latin American or Asian cultural attitudes accurately. “In China, for example, etiquette and attitudes are very different, so a successful strategy in Europe might fail in China. ChangeMasters can reflect these cultural differences,” Angehrn notes.

But it also makes clever use of informal aspects of corporate life. Informal networks, like the water cooler or coffee room, the psychological attitude of individuals, like openness or resistance to change, and even the status of individuals within the organization.

“Some people have enormous influence in a corporation or department through their reputation, or their informal networks of co-workers,” notes Angehrn.

Typically, teams of managers work together to play a game for 90 minutes. “It is not aimed at individuals,” says Angehrn, “And we recommend that it is run as a seminar, with a large number of staff forming teams to run through the change scenario, but some companies, like Ikea, run the game in small workshops.”

The limits of compulsion

The game allows teams to employ theory through various strategies, including compulsion, but each strategy chosen affects other parameters that can blow up later. “Compulsion is not very effective,” warns Angehrn, “Because it can increase resistance.” Just like in real life.

Afterwards, the game players are debriefed on their strategy and the lessons of the exercise are driven home.

The game is very difficult. “Nobody wins, nobody manages a painless project. I think this is the way it should be, it should be challenging and it should reflect real life. It tests the limits of managers’ confidence. The idea is for people to learn lessons and acquire new skills before carrying out a task in a realistic scenario,” Angehrn explains.

But for all its difficulty, ChangeMasters is not insincere. “People wouldn't play the game, or would complain about it loudly if they thought it was ‘fixed’,” reveals Angehrn.

In fact the opposite is the case, and players rave about the impact of learning sessions with ChangeMasters, commenting that it has changed their way of approaching a project. They say it gives them new tools, and a new understanding of the issues involved in change management.

Not quite Second Life

The game does not look like many modern games. “We initially produced an interface like the online game, Second Life. It had a 3D, richly visual environment. But executives spent too much time exploring the environment rather than playing through the games,” he says.

Instead, the screen uses graphs, text and buttons to offer an overview of the game status, track emerging developments and offer players a choice of actions.

The game incorporates the familiar tools of corporate communication, including newsletters, emails, memos, executive information systems (EIS) and formal networks like personnel in a specific department.

Ultimately, though, the game is about helping executives to acquire and practice useful skills, and many organizations, like Ikea, Fiat and the Scottish government, believe ChangeMasters achieves that.

Some of the world’s top universities, too, are enthusiastic, and ChangeMasters is used at Cambridge and INSEAD in Europe, Yale, MIT, Stanford and many other of the top-tier institutions in the USA, and CEIBS, the top Chinese school. The ChangeMasters simulations were based on work at INSEAD’s Centre for Advanced Learning Technologies (CALT).

ChangeMasters has refined the technical platform and is launching offices all over Europe under the brand AlphaExperiences. Initially, it is offering change management as the primary product, but the game engine itself could be adapted to other scenarios, like product development, and the partners will work on expanding that content.

Ultimately, however, ChangeMasters has an even larger vision, where it will offer a channel for other high-quality business education software to one day, perhaps, become the Amazon of executive education.

The ChangeMasters project received co-funding from the eTen Programme of the European Commission.

«Les jeux de simulation poussent les employés à se surpasser»

Albert Angehrn, professeur à l'INSEAD, est l'un des précurseurs de l'apprentissage du Management au travers des «serious games». Une méthode de plus en plus souvent utilisée dans les entreprises.

Par Cyril Jost - Bilan No.250 - 21.05.2008

Comment favoriser les processus d'apprentissage au sein de l'entreprise?

Depuis quelques années, les serious games (littéralement: «jeux sérieux») proposent une réponse à travers la simulation informatisée. A l'occasion d'une conférence atelier organisée en partenariat avec Bilan (lire en bas de page), nous avons posé quelques questions à Albert Angehrn, professeur à l'INSEAD et inventeur de la méthode Executive Information System (EIS), un outil de formation utilisé dans des entreprises comme Ikea, Credit Suisse, BMW ou DHL.

A quoi servent les «serious games»?

Les cadres supérieurs sont souvent entourés de gens qui leur disent qu'ils font tout juste. Ils perdent ainsi l'habitude de se mesurer aux autres. Le jeu est une excellente façon de motiver ces gens à se surpasser. C'est aussi l'occasion de leur permettre de tenter des expériences et de se tromper, ce qui n'est pas toujours possible dans la vraie vie d'une entreprise.

Le Management ne s'apprend tout de même pas grâce à un atelier d'une demi-journée…
Bien sûr, le Management est souvent une affaire d'expérience et de bon sens. Mais il y a aussi des phénomènes plus complexes, que l'on n'apprend pas forcément par la pratique. Par exemple, avec notre simulation, les participants apprennent qu'un changement important se diffuse comme une épidémie, en s'appuyant sur les 2 à 5% de personnes au sein de l'organisation qui se chargeront ensuite de convaincre tous les autres. Cette notion de diffusion «virale» du changement ne s'acquiert pas par intuition. C'est seulement à travers le jeu et la simulation qu'on peut véritablement s'entraîner.

A quoi ressemble concrètement une simulation EIS?

On divise l'assistance en petits groupes de 3 à 5 personnes. Chaque groupe se met en face d'un ordinateur et joue le rôle d'une équipe de consultants. L'entreprise qui les engage souhaite harmoniser les processus dans l'ensemble de ses filiales. Les consultants se retrouvent dans l'une de ces filiales et ont six mois (soit une heure et demie) pour convaincre le Management d'adopter ces changements. C'est typiquement le genre de situation que l'on rencontre en cas de fusion de deux entreprises.

D'autres scénarios possibles?

On peut changer les paramètres et situer le jeu en Chine; du coup, les règles de Management sont évidemment totalement différentes! On peut aussi décider de conduire cette simulation au sein d'une entreprise familiale ou dans une université. A chaque fois, il faut adopter une nouvelle stratégie pour introduire le changement avec succès.

Hormis la résistance au changement, y a-t-il d'autres thèmes que l'on peut modéliser?

Nous avons mis l'accent sur trois domaines: le changement, la collaboration et l'innovation.

Des pays sont-ils plus réceptifs que d'autres aux «serious games»?

Les pays scandinaves et les Etats-Unis sont des précurseurs. En revanche, au sud de l'Europe et notamment en France, les gens sont encore très sceptiques. En Asie, les méthodes d'apprentissage sont traditionnellement très peu interactives, mais c'est en train de changer rapidement.

Publications

Here below is a list of Professor Angehrn's most recent publications (2008-2009).
InnoTube: a video-based connection tool supporting collaborative innovation
download article (pdf) (via INSEAD library)

InnoTube: a video-based connection tool supporting collaborative innovation

Albert A. Angehrn (with Angelo Marco Luccini and Katrina Maxwell), published in: Interactive Learning Environments, Volume 17, Issue 3 September 2009 , pages 205 - 220.

Abstract:

Innovation is a key driver of organizational renewal and success. However, providing the right environment for innovative ideas to emerge and develop is not easy. This is further complicated by the fact that the professional environment is increasingly virtual as globally dispersed organizational and inter-organizational teams collaborate on innovative projects, making effective information and communication technologies indispensable. Although many organizations have knowledge management systems, most of these have not been developed with the aim of supporting the innovation process, and many do not even succeed in their primary aim, i.e., supporting knowledge exchange, as they do not take into consideration the emotional, psychological and social needs of individuals.

To address these issues, we have developed a video-based connection tool, InnoTube, which makes full use of social network ties and Web2.0 technologies to support collaborative innovation. InnoTube provides a showcase for innovation-related ideas and their inceptors, as well as proactively encourages the development of social connections and the brainstorming of cross functional globally dispersed teams.

Results of a successful initial pilot study in the automobile industry are also presented.

EagleRacing: Addressing Corporate Collaboration Challenges Through an Online Simulation Game
download article (pdf) for educational purposes only

Albert A. Angehrn (with Katrina Maxwell), "EagleRacing: Addressing Corporate Collaboration Challenges Through an Online Simulation Game," in: Innovate, Journal of Online Education, vol 5., Issue 6, Aug/Sept 2009.

Albert A. Angehrn and Katrina Maxwell discuss EagleRacing, a simulation that does not rely on a virtual world. Rather, EagleRacing, which is designed to teach collaboration skills to managers and decision makers, relies on an episodic video story to create a simulation narrative. Participants, who may be online or on site, use group decision support technology to facilitate collaboration with a small team around a series of mission-critical dilemmas; the decision a team makes at each juncture determines how the narrative develops. The simulation provides a learning experience that can help managers, decision makers, virtual teams, and online communities reflect on the challenges and opportunities of collaboration and group decision making.

Understanding the Organizational Dynamics of Change in China

A Multimedia Simulation Approach

download article (pdf, INSEAD library catalog)

S. Zhao, Albert A. Angehrn, H. Yang, P. Leliaert, and L. Van Geffen.

Understanding the Organizational Dynamics of Change in China, A Multimedia Simulation Approach," The Chinese Economy, vol. 41, no.3, May-June 2008, pp. 68-89.

Abstract:

The LingHe Simulation offers an advanced multimedia learning tool for Chinese and foreign managers who want to implement organizational change in current business in China. Besides being recognizable and realistic, the simulation context strives to "force" managers to make mistakes (on the premise that one learns as much if not more from one’s mistakes as from one’s successes) and avoid "quick-fix" solutions, including, for instance replacing the entire top-management layer and subsequently imposing the intended changes.

Changing Chinese Firms: Overcoming Resistance
download article (pdf)

As a further reference to the LingHe Simulation , see also: Albert A. Angehrn, Philippe Leliaert, Shuming Zhao, Leo van Geffen, Huifang Yang (2005), "Changing Chinese Firms: Overcoming Resistance," INSEAD Quarterly, No.11, July-September 2005.

Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals
download article (pdf, INSEAD library catalog)

Albert A. Angehrn, A.M. Luccini, K. Maxwell, and F. Rajola. “Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals," in Emerging Technologies and Information Systems for the Knowledge Society

Book Series: Lecture Notes in Computer Science

Volume: 5288/2008

Book: Emerging Technologies and Information Systems for the Knowledge Society

Pages 167-176

Subject: Collection Computer Science

Springer Link

Date:Saturday, September 20, 2008

TENTube: A Video-based Connection Tool Supporting Competence Development
download article (pdf, INSEAD library catalog)

Abstract:

The vast majority of knowledge management initiatives fail because they do not take sufficiently into account the emotional, psychological and social needs of individuals. Only if users see real value for themselves will they actively use and contribute their own knowledge to the system, and engage with other users. Connection dynamics can make this easier, and even enjoyable, by connecting people and bringing them closer through shared experiences such as playing a game together. A higher connectedness of people to other people, and to relevant knowledge assets, will motivate them to participate more actively and increase system usage. In this paper, we describe the design of TENTube, a video-based connection tool being developed in CALT to support competence development. TENTube integrates rich profiling and network visualization and navigation with agent-enhanced game-like connection dynamics.

Serious Games on the Move 08

The proceedings to the "Serious Games on the Move 08" (Otto Petrovic and Anthony Brand, Eds.) presents all results of the June 2008 conference (of the same name) on game software applications that are designed to do more than entertain.

ISBN: 978-3-211-09417-4 (forthcoming in January 2009)

Professor Angehrn's presentation, as part of this collection, is entitled: "Game Hostile Environments."

The focus of the contents lie on research results and developments in the rapidly moving field of serious games and their potential use in education and training as well as in the presentation of several showcases.

This volume is written for multimedia designers, pedagogues.

Keywords: 2D/3D game environments cross-platform content mobile learning game models simulation games.

Coopetition

Albert A. Angehrn and Claudia Loebbecke: Joint chapter entitled: “Coopetition”, in Encyclopedia of Knowledge Management, 2nd edition (forthcoming 2009), Information Science Reference.

A book edited by David G. Schwartz, Bar-Ilan University, Israel.

Abstract:

This article introduces the scientific literature on Knowledge Management Under Coopetition and then describes the concept of Coopetitive Learning and Knowledge Exchange Networks (CoLKENs), their components, and their generic structure. It reviews CoLKEN fundamentals and components, and suggests a CoLKEN taxonomy. Key research questions are followed by generalized key insights from studying CoLKENs as the setting for Knowledge Management Under Coopetition. The article then examines the levers for managing CoLKENs, and closes with future trends and brief conclusions.

Enhancing Social Interaction in Competence Development Networks: A Conceptual Framework
download article (pdf, INSEAD library catalog)

Albert A. Angehrn, K. Maxwell, and B. Sereno: “Enhancing Social Interaction in Competence Development Networks: A Conceptual Framework," International Journal of Learning Technology, (IJLT), vol. 3, N°4, pp 424-442, June 2008

Abstract:

This paper addresses the challenge of enhancing social interaction through value-added connections among online community members engaged in knowledge exchange. We report on our exploration of three types of connection dynamics: 1 features enabling network members to visualize and browse through relationship networks; 2 intelligent agents; and 3 innovative game dynamics aimed at stimulating the identification and establishment of value-adding connections between users and knowledge assets, individuals, groups and communities. We describe here how such dynamics could be embedded in lifelong competence development networks.

Awards

  • 2002: IBM Faculty Award for the project “L2LinKS: Learning to Learn in the Knowledge Society”
  • 2001: Institute of Financial Services (IFS) Financial Innovation Award for Most Stimulating Contribution, IFS, London, UK
  • 1997: Finalist at the Best Paper Competition of the 30th HICSS Conference
  • 1992: First Prize at the Third International Competition for Outstanding DSS Achievements sponsored by The Institute of Management Sciences (TIMS)
  • 1990: Distinguished Contribution Award at the First International Competition for Outstanding DSS Achievements sponsored by The Institute of Management Sciences (TIMS)
  • 1990: Apple Trophy for the “Triple C” Decision Support System at the Apple Trophy Competition sponsored by Apple Computers
  • 1989: First Prize at the Competition for the Best Swiss Research Contribution to the field of Operations Research sponsored by the Swiss Society of Operations Research (SVOR)

Contact Professor Albert A. Angehrn

Professor Albert A. Angehrn

INSEAD

boulevard de Constance

77305 Fontainebleau, France

Email: [email protected]

INSEAD personal page at: https://www.insead.edu/faculty-research/faculty/albert-a-angehrn/personal-site

Contact information on the INSEAD Europe Campus:

 

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