MBA Elective Courses

Economics & Political Science

 

This intensive core curriculum gives you a foundation in the fundamental practices of business including finance, accounting, marketing, economics, leadership, strategy, business ethics, and broad management skills essential to succeed in any career.

This mini-elective takes place over two days where we will use simulations and role-plays to experience Agile. It will include discussions with guest speakers with knowledge of Agile organisations. The purpose is to better understand what Agile is, how it works and how we can make it work in different kinds of environments. 

Deep financial crises are among the most traumatic experiences for societies and businesses. Understanding and anticipating such a macroeconomic accident is essential for both for policy makers and for business leaders. The objective of this course is to understand how countries get into financial crisis and what are the trade-offs that decision-makers face in crisis: bail out, austerity, conditionality, debt restructuring, and contagion. Using case studies to examine why the crisis occurred, how it was managed and how it changed the global monetary system, students can conclude with analysing the strength of the global financial safety net and its increasing regionalisation and fragmentation.

This class shows students how to use game theory to give an analytic treatment of business problems. The target audience is those who are intrigued by the game theory presented in the core class and would like to gain a deeper understanding of such analytic methods. We will touch on issues such as: How can you affect your rival's actions? How can you signal your talent to potential employers? We will include applications to financial markets and the financial crisis.

To be an effective manager in emerging country markets, it is essential to understand the opportunities these countries offer and the constraints that managers and businesses face in such countries. In this course, students will tackle current issues such as: the debate on the failure of aid, the telecom revolution in the creation of new markets and services, the role of foreign direct Investment, the role of the new emerging economic powers, attempts of multinationals to innovate in emerging markets and their varying success record and strategies to deal with corruption.

For students planning a career in the health care sector, or with innovative organisations that interact with the health care sector, having a comprehensive understanding of the growing role of the health and health care sectors in the economy is essential. This course examines the role of government in the financing and delivery of health care, and how government decisions affect firm strategy and behaviour. It will also provide context and analysis on health care cost growth and containment strategies.

Where does the law draw the lines and what should you watch out for? Students will study cases from around the world and explore the kinds of novel legal dilemmas that future business leaders will have to confront. The cases involve the most current legal issues facing businesses in areas such as intellectual property, labor and employment, product liability, and false advertising, among others.

How different will the world in 35 years look to the one we know today? How and to what extent will the environment of business and management change in this period? Drawing on a wide range of social-scientific literature, this course will provide you with analytical tools for thinking about the longer-term future and assess what kinds of demographic, scientific and technological, economic, cultural and political trends are likely to shape the world up to 2050. Students will also look at how these trends might interact, what consequences and implications they might have, and how business might be affected by and respond to them.

The current lingering crisis is a perfect opportunity to analyse how, to what extent and why capitalism has changed over time – and why it has assumed different forms in different geographies. Apart from focusing on these issues, the course will also look at contemporary debates about the future of capitalism and its possible forms, such as “radical”, “social democratic” and “green”.

How the EU crisis is managed will affect economic and political trends not only in Europe, but also in the wider world, as Europe is the biggest single market in the world, the world’s biggest trading bloc and an important player in international trade, monetary, regulatory, environmental and security politics. This course will look at how the EU developed historically and how it is organised and makes decisions. It will focus in particular on its recent and current crises – the Eurozone, migration and Ukraine crises and ‘Brexit’ – with the goal of assessing whether and in what form the EU may survive in the future and what kind of role it is likely to play in world affairs.

Growing inequality is one of the biggest social, economic and political challenges of our time. The concentration of wealth at the very top is part of a much broader rise in disparities all along the income distribution. While people at the top enjoy increasing income and employment opportunities, the middle-class face narrowing employment options and stagnating incomes. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the causes and implications of these changes for both society and for business, and explore in greater detail one of the major issues facing businesses and governments today.  

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